• Diamond Discs Guide

  • Addax offers a wide range of cutting and grinding wheels that are available for working with hard, medium or abrasive construction materials.
    The information below details the different types of blades that are now available. 

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    Diamond Disc Overview


    Cutting discs should only be used for cutting applications, and not for grinding. As a general rule, wheels are designed to work similar materials. For example, a hard materials blade is designed to cut media such as engineering brick and reinforced concrete.

    To enable this, the metal bond or “matrix” which holds the diamond to the body of the tool is relatively soft, as the diamond will blunt quite quickly and it is necessary to keep releasing fresh diamond to the edge in order to keep cutting. An abrasive materials blade however, has a bond which is harder in order to resist premature release of diamonds which are not yet worn out due to the softer nature of the material it is cutting.

    If a hard blade is used in a soft material the matrix will wear very quickly and the blade will not last. Conversely, if an abrasive materials blade is used to cut a hard material, then the diamond will wear out before the hard bond releases new cutting edges, and it will become blunt. However in this case, the blade can be resharpened by running it in an abrasive material (such as insulation block) for a short period.
    It is very important to correctly match the core or wheel to the material to be cut.

     

    Safety Standards and Requirements


    Is operator safety your main concern?

    Addax professional diamond blades are manufactured to meet the requirements of European standard EN 13236 by one of the largest producers of diamond superabrasives in the world. The production facilities are regularly audited by the Organisation for Safety of Abrasives () and licensed to wear their trademark.

     

     

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    Disc Types


    Sintered BladesSintered Blades
    The steel body and the compressed diamond/metal powder are subjected to baking until the powder forms the finished “matrix”. This is the standard quality blade, and the most economic in terms of purchase price.
     


    Sintered Blades

    Laser Welded Blades
    On these blades, the segment is “hot pressed sintered”, i.e. the matrix is formed separate to the body under conditions of heat and pressure. This leads to a more dense, longer lasting segment which is then laser welded to the steel body. Laser welding provides a very secure bond between the matrix and the blade body. Blades of this type are usually more economic in terms of cutting length per pound (£).
     


    Sintered Blades

    Silver Soldered Cores and Cup Wheels
    In the case of cup grinding wheels and core bits, a process known as silver soldering can be employed. This is where hot sintered segments are individually brazed onto the steel body. This is usually because the segment is curved and therefore difficult to laser weld. 

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    Sintered Blades

    Segmented Blades
    This is where the diamond wheel is split into defined segments. The slots in between the segments allow for cooling and expansion. Turbo segmented blades have recesses formed into the side walls of the segment which increase dust removal and cutting speed.
     


    Sintered Blades

    Continuous Rim Blades
    These blades have no break in the matrix and are used predominantly for cutting ceramic tiles and decorative stone such as marble. The lack of gaps in the cutting surface reduces chipping of the material being cut.
     


    Sintered Blades

    Continuous Rim Turbo Blades
    These are a hybrid between continuous rim and segmented blades, which can give a faster, cleaner cut in certain materials.